Good Bye, Good Bye George

Offical Funeral: Louis George’s casket is borne away from the  Catholic Church at Micoud.

Offical Funeral: Louis George’s casket is borne away from the
Catholic Church at Micoud.

Listening to Ronald “Boo” Hinkson’s musical tribute “Tears In Heaven” by Eric Clapton and singing the interrogatory words softly to myself had me thinking: “Would you know my name, if I saw you in heaven? Will it be the same, if I saw you in heaven?” This then led me to question how we move forward as a country. Will we wipe our crocodile tears and hastily continue our daily norms like we have done to most who have made major contributions to this nation after burying them? Or will we actually take into perspective the accomplishments of national significance that have been made possible through determination and selfless service of such individuals and work to further enhance them?

These questions ran through my mind as I stood outside the Saint Lucy’s National Shrine for the funeral of the late Honorable Louis George. The former MP for Micoud North passed away on January 2, 2014 after struggling for over a decade with his illness and diabetes, even losing both his legs in the process.

As is the custom for individuals who have served their country, the funeral for the late MP and former Minister of Education, Labour and Culture commenced with tributes. According to longtime friend Andrew Roberts who gave the eulogy, he and George were ‘inseparable’, having attended school and the Teacher’s Training College together, being assigned to the R.C Boys School and eventually teaching at the then Micoud Junior Secondary together. The two even served together on the Micoud Village Council. It was only when George decided to venture into politics, according to Roberts, that their friendship became a little distant.

“Many said that George was reserved, but that never bothered him. He served his community and his country well, and your presence here is testimony to that…” said Dr. Gale Rigobert in her tribute. Focusing on his contribution as Education Minister, Dr. Rigobert referred to George’s preparation and introduction into politics, saying “he read many literally political books, which prepared him for his divine calling”.

She confessed that she got to know George after he won the Micoud North seat for the United Workers Party in 1982, when she was only 8 or 9 years old. She mentioned that when she was contemplating her decision to venture into the political arena, she had many conversations with Louis George who was always willing to share his knowledge and offer her advice. When she finally made the decision to place herself in the running for the Micoud North seat, she again went to her friend for some final words of encouragement. “Sharpen all your pencils” were the simple but meaningful words passed onto her; words she says she considered thoroughly and kept with her ever since as they were of much significance.

Louis George did not want a state funeral, which is customary for a person who lived a life of service to country, and instead received an official funeral. And as much as George himself requested publicly that he “would not want a funeral that comes with all of the fanfare” it would be very difficult to accurately honor those last wishes considering his ‘stature’ in Saint Lucian and Caribbean realms. In attendance at the thanksgiving ceremony were the Governor General Dame Pearlette Louisy, President of the Senate Claudius Francis, Police Commissioner Vernon Francois, Deputy Chief Fire Officer Lambert Charles, Prime Minister Dr. Kenny D. Anthony, government ministers and official both past and present, officers of the Royal Saint Lucia Police Force, the Fire Service Department and the Bordelais Correctional Facility, and members of the Cadet Corps.

And when the time came to send him off to his final resting place, Louis Bertrand George received his final wish, “to remain in Micoud”, as he was buried in the cemetery of his community of origin.

But how will we as a country remember the teacher, Education Minister and Deputy Prime Minister who served this country wholeheartedly with the aim of seeking better opportunities and equality for all Saint Lucians? Will we be quick to forget Louis George in his death as past and present governments forgot him in the latter part of his life and through his illness?

How will we remember him as a country after his death? As the choir at the graveside sang glumly “Goodbye, Goodbye” to Louis George, I couldn’t help but wonder if it was goodbye to his memory as well.

 

(PHOTOS: BILL MORTLEY)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.0

 

L

istening to Ronald “Boo” Hinkson’s musical tribute “Tears In Heaven” by Eric Clapton and singing the interrogatory words softly to myself had me thinking: “Would you know my name, if I saw you in heaven? Will it be the same, if I saw you in heaven?” This then led me to question how we move forward as a country. Will we wipe our crocodile tears and hastily continue our daily norms like we have done to most who have made major contributions to this nation after burying them? Or will we actually take into perspective the accomplishments of national significance that have been made possible through determination and selfless service of such individuals and work to further enhance them?

These questions ran through my mind as I stood outside the Saint Lucy’s National Shrine for the funeral of the late Honorable Louis George. The former MP for Micoud North passed away on January 2, 2014 after struggling for over a decade with his illness and diabetes, even losing both his legs in the process.

As is the custom for individuals who have served their country, the funeral for the late MP and former Minister of Education, Labour and Culture commenced with tributes. According to longtime friend Andrew Roberts who gave the eulogy, he and George were ‘inseparable’, having attended school and the Teacher’s Training College together, being assigned to the R.C Boys School and eventually teaching at the then Micoud Junior Secondary together. The two even served together on the Micoud Village Council. It was only when George decided to venture into politics, according to Roberts, that their friendship became a little distant.

“Many said that George was reserved, but that never bothered him. He served his community and his country well, and your presence here is testimony to that…” said Dr. Gale Rigobert in her tribute. Focusing on his contribution as Education Minister, Dr. Rigobert referred to George’s preparation and introduction into politics, saying “he read many literally political books, which prepared him for his divine calling”.

She confessed that she got to know George after he won the Micoud North seat for the United Workers Party in 1982, when she was only 8 or 9 years old. She mentioned that when she was contemplating her decision to venture into the political arena, she had many conversations with Louis George who was always willing to share his knowledge and offer her advice. When she finally made the decision to place herself in the running for the Micoud North seat, she again went to her friend for some final words of encouragement. “Sharpen all your pencils” were the simple but meaningful words passed onto her; words she says she considered thoroughly and kept with her ever since as they were of much significance.

Louis George did not want a state funeral, which is customary for a person who lived a life of service to country, and instead received an official funeral. And as much as George himself requested publicly that he “would not want a funeral that comes with all of the fanfare” it would be very difficult to accurately honor those last wishes considering his ‘stature’ in Saint Lucian and Caribbean realms. In attendance at the thanksgiving ceremony were the Governor General Dame Pearlette Louisy, President of the Senate Claudius Francis, Police Commissioner Vernon Francois, Deputy Chief Fire Officer Lambert Charles, Prime Minister Dr. Kenny D. Anthony, government ministers and official both past and present, officers of the Royal Saint Lucia Police Force, the Fire Service Department and the Bordelais Correctional Facility, and members of the Cadet Corps.

And when the time came to send him off to his final resting place, Louis Bertrand George received his final wish, “to remain in Micoud”, as he was buried in the cemetery of his community of origin.

But how will we as a country remember the teacher, Education Minister and Deputy Prime Minister who served this country wholeheartedly with the aim of seeking better opportunities and equality for all Saint Lucians? Will we be quick to forget Louis George in his death as past and present governments forgot him in the latter part of his life and through his illness?

How will we remember him as a country after his death? As the choir at the graveside sang glumly “Goodbye, Goodbye” to Louis George, I couldn’t help but wonder if it was goodbye to his memory as well.

 

(PHOTOS: BILL MORTLEY)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L

istening to Ronald “Boo” Hinkson’s musical tribute “Tears In Heaven” by Eric Clapton and singing the interrogatory words softly to myself had me thinking: “Would you know my name, if I saw you in heaven? Will it be the same, if I saw you in heaven?” This then led me to question how we move forward as a country. Will we wipe our crocodile tears and hastily continue our daily norms like we have done to most who have made major contributions to this nation after burying them? Or will we actually take into perspective the accomplishments of national significance that have been made possible through determination and selfless service of such individuals and work to further enhance them?

These questions ran through my mind as I stood outside the Saint Lucy’s National Shrine for the funeral of the late Honorable Louis George. The former MP for Micoud North passed away on January 2, 2014 after struggling for over a decade with his illness and diabetes, even losing both his legs in the process.

As is the custom for individuals who have served their country, the funeral for the late MP and former Minister of Education, Labour and Culture commenced with tributes. According to longtime friend Andrew Roberts who gave the eulogy, he and George were ‘inseparable’, having attended school and the Teacher’s Training College together, being assigned to the R.C Boys School and eventually teaching at the then Micoud Junior Secondary together. The two even served together on the Micoud Village Council. It was only when George decided to venture into politics, according to Roberts, that their friendship became a little distant.

“Many said that George was reserved, but that never bothered him. He served his community and his country well, and your presence here is testimony to that…” said Dr. Gale Rigobert in her tribute. Focusing on his contribution as Education Minister, Dr. Rigobert referred to George’s preparation and introduction into politics, saying “he read many literally political books, which prepared him for his divine calling”.

She confessed that she got to know George after he won the Micoud North seat for the United Workers Party in 1982, when she was only 8 or 9 years old. She mentioned that when she was contemplating her decision to venture into the political arena, she had many conversations with Louis George who was always willing to share his knowledge and offer her advice. When she finally made the decision to place herself in the running for the Micoud North seat, she again went to her friend for some final words of encouragement. “Sharpen all your pencils” were the simple but meaningful words passed onto her; words she says she considered thoroughly and kept with her ever since as they were of much significance.

Louis George did not want a state funeral, which is customary for a person who lived a life of service to country, and instead received an official funeral. And as much as George himself requested publicly that he “would not want a funeral that comes with all of the fanfare” it would be very difficult to accurately honor those last wishes considering his ‘stature’ in Saint Lucian and Caribbean realms. In attendance at the thanksgiving ceremony were the Governor General Dame Pearlette Louisy, President of the Senate Claudius Francis, Police Commissioner Vernon Francois, Deputy Chief Fire Officer Lambert Charles, Prime Minister Dr. Kenny D. Anthony, government ministers and official both past and present, officers of the Royal Saint Lucia Police Force, the Fire Service Department and the Bordelais Correctional Facility, and members of the Cadet Corps.

And when the time came to send him off to his final resting place, Louis Bertrand George received his final wish, “to remain in Micoud”, as he was buried in the cemetery of his community of origin.

But how will we as a country remember the teacher, Education Minister and Deputy Prime Minister who served this country wholeheartedly with the aim of seeking better opportunities and equality for all Saint Lucians? Will we be quick to forget Louis George in his death as past and present governments forgot him in the latter part of his life and through his illness?

How will we remember him as a country after his death? As the choir at the graveside sang glumly “Goodbye, Goodbye” to Louis George, I couldn’t help but wonder if it was goodbye to his memory as well.

 

(PHOTOS: BILL MORTLEY)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L

istening to Ronald “Boo” Hinkson’s musical tribute “Tears In Heaven” by Eric Clapton and singing the interrogatory words softly to myself had me thinking: “Would you know my name, if I saw you in heaven? Will it be the same, if I saw you in heaven?” This then led me to question how we move forward as a country. Will we wipe our crocodile tears and hastily continue our daily norms like we have done to most who have made major contributions to this nation after burying them? Or will we actually take into perspective the accomplishments of national significance that have been made possible through determination and selfless service of such individuals and work to further enhance them?

These questions ran through my mind as I stood outside the Saint Lucy’s National Shrine for the funeral of the late Honorable Louis George. The former MP for Micoud North passed away on January 2, 2014 after struggling for over a decade with his illness and diabetes, even losing both his legs in the process.

As is the custom for individuals who have served their country, the funeral for the late MP and former Minister of Education, Labour and Culture commenced with tributes. According to longtime friend Andrew Roberts who gave the eulogy, he and George were ‘inseparable’, having attended school and the Teacher’s Training College together, being assigned to the R.C Boys School and eventually teaching at the then Micoud Junior Secondary together. The two even served together on the Micoud Village Council. It was only when George decided to venture into politics, according to Roberts, that their friendship became a little distant.

“Many said that George was reserved, but that never bothered him. He served his community and his country well, and your presence here is testimony to that…” said Dr. Gale Rigobert in her tribute. Focusing on his contribution as Education Minister, Dr. Rigobert referred to George’s preparation and introduction into politics, saying “he read many literally political books, which prepared him for his divine calling”.

She confessed that she got to know George after he won the Micoud North seat for the United Workers Party in 1982, when she was only 8 or 9 years old. She mentioned that when she was contemplating her decision to venture into the political arena, she had many conversations with Louis George who was always willing to share his knowledge and offer her advice. When she finally made the decision to place herself in the running for the Micoud North seat, she again went to her friend for some final words of encouragement. “Sharpen all your pencils” were the simple but meaningful words passed onto her; words she says she considered thoroughly and kept with her ever since as they were of much significance.

Louis George did not want a state funeral, which is customary for a person who lived a life of service to country, and instead received an official funeral. And as much as George himself requested publicly that he “would not want a funeral that comes with all of the fanfare” it would be very difficult to accurately honor those last wishes considering his ‘stature’ in Saint Lucian and Caribbean realms. In attendance at the thanksgiving ceremony were the Governor General Dame Pearlette Louisy, President of the Senate Claudius Francis, Police Commissioner Vernon Francois, Deputy Chief Fire Officer Lambert Charles, Prime Minister Dr. Kenny D. Anthony, government ministers and official both past and present, officers of the Royal Saint Lucia Police Force, the Fire Service Department and the Bordelais Correctional Facility, and members of the Cadet Corps.

And when the time came to send him off to his final resting place, Louis Bertrand George received his final wish, “to remain in Micoud”, as he was buried in the cemetery of his community of origin.

But how will we as a country remember the teacher, Education Minister and Deputy Prime Minister who served this country wholeheartedly with the aim of seeking better opportunities and equality for all Saint Lucians? Will we be quick to forget Louis George in his death as past and present governments forgot him in the latter part of his life and through his illness?

How will we remember him as a country after his death? As the choir at the graveside sang glumly “Goodbye, Goodbye” to Louis George, I couldn’t help but wonder if it was goodbye to his memory as well.

 

(PHOTOS: BILL MORTLEY)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

L

istening to Ronald “Boo” Hinkson’s musical tribute “Tears In Heaven” by Eric Clapton and singing the interrogatory words softly to myself had me thinking: “Would you know my name, if I saw you in heaven? Will it be the same, if I saw you in heaven?” This then led me to question how we move forward as a country. Will we wipe our crocodile tears and hastily continue our daily norms like we have done to most who have made major contributions to this nation after burying them? Or will we actually take into perspective the accomplishments of national significance that have been made possible through determination and selfless service of such individuals and work to further enhance them?

These questions ran through my mind as I stood outside the Saint Lucy’s National Shrine for the funeral of the late Honorable Louis George. The former MP for Micoud North passed away on January 2, 2014 after struggling for over a decade with his illness and diabetes, even losing both his legs in the process.

As is the custom for individuals who have served their country, the funeral for the late MP and former Minister of Education, Labour and Culture commenced with tributes. According to longtime friend Andrew Roberts who gave the eulogy, he and George were ‘inseparable’, having attended school and the Teacher’s Training College together, being assigned to the R.C Boys School and eventually teaching at the then Micoud Junior Secondary together. The two even served together on the Micoud Village Council. It was only when George decided to venture into politics, according to Roberts, that their friendship became a little distant.

“Many said that George was reserved, but that never bothered him. He served his community and his country well, and your presence here is testimony to that…” said Dr. Gale Rigobert in her tribute. Focusing on his contribution as Education Minister, Dr. Rigobert referred to George’s preparation and introduction into politics, saying “he read many literally political books, which prepared him for his divine calling”.

She confessed that she got to know George after he won the Micoud North seat for the United Workers Party in 1982, when she was only 8 or 9 years old. She mentioned that when she was contemplating her decision to venture into the political arena, she had many conversations with Louis George who was always willing to share his knowledge and offer her advice. When she finally made the decision to place herself in the running for the Micoud North seat, she again went to her friend for some final words of encouragement. “Sharpen all your pencils” were the simple but meaningful words passed onto her; words she says she considered thoroughly and kept with her ever since as they were of much significance.

Louis George did not want a state funeral, which is customary for a person who lived a life of service to country, and instead received an official funeral. And as much as George himself requested publicly that he “would not want a funeral that comes with all of the fanfare” it would be very difficult to accurately honor those last wishes considering his ‘stature’ in Saint Lucian and Caribbean realms. In attendance at the thanksgiving ceremony were the Governor General Dame Pearlette Louisy, President of the Senate Claudius Francis, Police Commissioner Vernon Francois, Deputy Chief Fire Officer Lambert Charles, Prime Minister Dr. Kenny D. Anthony, government ministers and official both past and present, officers of the Royal Saint Lucia Police Force, the Fire Service Department and the Bordelais Correctional Facility, and members of the Cadet Corps.

And when the time came to send him off to his final resting place, Louis Bertrand George received his final wish, “to remain in Micoud”, as he was buried in the cemetery of his community of origin.

But how will we as a country remember the teacher, Education Minister and Deputy Prime Minister who served this country wholeheartedly with the aim of seeking better opportunities and equality for all Saint Lucians? Will we be quick to forget Louis George in his death as past and present governments forgot him in the latter part of his life and through his illness?

How will we remember him as a country after his death? As the choir at the graveside sang glumly “Goodbye, Goodbye” to Louis George, I couldn’t help but wonder if it was goodbye to his memory as well.

 

(PHOTOS: BILL MORTLEY)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share your feedback with us.

Comments are closed.

← Go Back | bbApp | Headlines Back to Top ↑
THE STAR Newspaper screen-shot-2016-12-02-at-7-33-25-pm
Magazines available in THE STAR Newspaper
2Nite Magazine for Saturday October 1st, 2016 ~ Issue no. 204
2nite Magazine
Sports & Health Magazine for October 1st, 2016 ~ Issue no. 112
Sports & Health Inc